New CRFM Logo for website updated

Sherlene Audinett

Sherlene Audinett

 

The Fisherfolk of Bottle and Glass village in Barrouallie, St. Vincent and the Grenadines will soon be able to catch more fish, faster than before and using less gas. This will be made possible by the placing of ‘shelters’ called Fish Aggregating Devices or FADs in the ocean. Fish are attracted to these floating structures or FADs and as they gather around them, the fishermen would find it easier to catch them. Fish that can be caught around FADs include mahi mahi, wahoo, marlin, swordfish, skipjacks, dolphin and tuna.

The FADs are being developed and placed by the Caribbean Fisheries Comanagement (CARIFICO) Project which is being funded by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) in partnership with the Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism (CRFM) and the Fisheries Division in the Ministry of Agriculture, Rural Transformation, Forestry, Fisheries and Industry.

On Thursday, 3rd April 2014, a Fishers Consultation was held at the Barrouallie Fisheries Centre with a team of stakeholders as well as Japanese experts Mr. Nariaki Mikuni and Mr. Mitsuhiro Ishida. Mr. Travon Ferary, Fisheries Assistant, welcomed the group of about twelve fishermen and introduced Mr. Ishida who made a presentation on the construction of the FAD, materials to be used and methods of deployment, illustrated by colour photographs and diagrams. He emphasized the importance of choosing a good location and depth to place the FAD; where the maximum amount of fish would gather.

The fishermen requested assistance from the Fisheries Division in choosing the best site and arrangements were made for staff to accompany the fishermen out to sea the following day.  Interest in the Project is low at present, but it is hoped that the fishers who were present at the meeting would spread the word about the benefits of using a FAD. In his remarks, Mr. Mikuni appealed to the fishermen to encourage their friends to participate in the Project because the FAD will belong to them and would benefit the entire fishing community, bring more income and a better way of life for the fishers and their families.

In conclusion, the local fishermen were advised to work along with Mr. Shamal Connell, the CARIFICO Liaison Officer for the west coast and in a spirit of unity for the success of the CARIFICO Project in St. Vincent and the Grenadines. 

 

This report is the second of four outputs in this initiative of CRFM and FAO on ‘Climate change adaptation and disaster risk management in fisheries and aquaculture in the CARICOM region’. The aim is to develop a strategy and action plan for integrating DRM, CCA and fisheries and aquaculture, with a focus on small-scale fisheries (SSF) and small-scale aquaculture.

This strategy and action plan is built upon, and integrates into, core policy documents. The regional policy context is primarily the ‘Regional Framework for Achieving Development Resilient to Climate Change’ (the Regional Framework) that articulates CARICOM’s strategy on climate change. CARICOM Heads of Government endorsed the Regional Framework at their July 2009 meeting in Guyana and issued the Liliendaal Declaration which sets out key climate change related interests and aims of CARICOM Member States. Based on the Liliendaal Declaration is the Implementation Plan (IP) for the Regional Framework. It is entitled ‘Delivering transformational change 2011 - 2021’ and incorporated several global to regional instruments concerning climate change and variability.See volume 1 for references and a comprehensive list of recommended further reading.

Fisheries and aquaculture initiatives in the CARICOM region should be integrated into the IP and take into account the CARICOM and OECS approaches to climate change that integrate DRM. Inclusion of, or collaboration with, non-CARICOM Caribbean countries in the IP also needs to be cnsidered. The CDEMA Enhanced CDM Framework for 2007-2012 is another core document that emphasises in Outcome 4 the need to focus on community level adaptation and management. The fourteenth session of the Western Central Atlantic Fishery Commission (WECAFC), held in Panama in February 2012, agreed to address CCA and DRM in fisheries and aquaculture in future sessions and, in its 2012 - 2013 Work Plan, included the preparation of a strategy, action plan and programme proposal on these, to be supported by FAO. Several policy instruments need to be taken into account specifically for ecosystem approaches to fisheries and aquaculture. These include the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries (FAO 1995) and the Caribbean Community Common Fisheries Policy (CCCFP) and the OECS St George’s Declaration of Principles for Environmental Sustainability (SGD).These documents contribute to a vision such as: regional society and economy that is resilient to a changing climate and enhanced through comprehensive disaster management and sustainable use of aquatic resources.

The CCCCC Regional Framework contains five strategy elements and twenty goals or similar statements. Some are more relevant to fisheries and aquaculture, using an ecosystem approach, than others. Several aspects are developed in the IP, mainly under the heading of coastal and marine matters. This strategy and action plan incorporates fisheries and aquaculture more prominently into the IP as requested by the CRFM in order to strengthen the existing linkages to mutual advantage.

The strategy and action plan draws on the above-mentioned documents, elaborates on the concept of transformation and develops content to which the proposed programme for the region can be linked (see Volume 3). This volume sets out strategic actions “to strengthen regional and national cooperation and develop capacity in addressing climate change impacts and disasters in the fisheries and aquaculture sector”. It draws upon key regional policy instruments on fisheries, aquaculture, climate change and disasters. Ultimately it will be important for there to be linkages between the enhanced IP and critical fisheries and aquaculture policy at the regional and national levels. A protocol to the CCCFP that sets out these relationships could be a logical next step in this process. 

 

Thursday, 20 February 2014 13:59

CLME PROJECT OUTPUTS

  

DATE AUTHOR TITLE
 2013  CRFM Report of the Second Meeting of the CRFM / CLME Large Pelagic Fishery Case Study Steering Committee - CRFM Technaisl and Advisory Document No 2013 / 4
 2013  CRFM Report of the Second Meeting of the CRFM / CLME Eastern Caribbean Flyingfish Fishery Case Study Steering Committee - CRFM Technical and Advisory Document No. 2013 / 3
 2012  CRFM  SAP Report on Large Pelagic Fisheries - CRFM Technical and Advisory Document No. 2012 / 15
2012 CRFM SAP Report on Flyingfish Fisheries - CRFM Technical and Advisory Document No. 2012 / 14
2012 CRFM The CRFM Meta-Data Base Contribution to the CLME Project Information management System (IMS) Component - CRFM Technical and Advisory Document no. 2012 / 13
 2012  CRFM  Report of the First Meeting of the CRFM / WECAFC Working Group on Flyingfish in the Eastern Caribbean. CRFM Technical and Advisory Document No. 2012 / 12
 2012  CRFM  CRFM Consultancy Report on Stakeholder Identification and Analysis of the Large Pelagic Fishery in the Wider Caribbean - CRFM Technical and Advisory Document No. 2012 / 9
 2012  CRFM  Consultancy Report on review of Existing Policy, Legal and Institutional Arrangements for Governance and Management of Large Pelagic Fisheries in the Caribbean Large Marine Ecosystem - CRFM Technical and Advisory Document No. 2012 / 8
 2012  CRFM  Consultancy Report on Stakeholder Identification and Analysis of the Flyingfish Fishery in the Wider Caribbean - CRFM Technical and Advisory Document No. 2012 / 7
 2012  CRFM  CRFM Consultancy Report on Review of Existing Policy, Legal and Institutional Arrangements for Governance and Management of Flyingfish Fisheries in the Caribbean Large Marine Ecosystem - CRFM Technical and Advisory Document No. 2012 / 6
2011 CRFM Report of the First Meeting of the CRFM / CLME Large Pelagic Fishery Consultancy steering Committee - CRFM Technical and Advisory Document No. 2011 / 2
 2011  CRFM Report of the First Meeting of the CRFM / CLME Eastern Caribbean Flyingfish Fishery Consultancy Steering Committee - CRFM Technical and Advisory Document No. 2011 / 1
     
     

 

 

Fish and seafood are important components of the diet of the Caribbean population.  However, in the Caribbean region most of the traditional commercially important fish species and species groups are reported to be either fully developed or over-exploited. Despite efforts to increase production of fish and seafood, the region is still a major importer of the commonly consumed fish and seafood.  These foods represent healthier options to consume with respect to protein content and other health benefits throughout the life course.  The benefits of fish and seafood include reduction in cardiovascular diseases through the regulation of blood clotting and vessel constriction thus reducing the risk of heart disease and may prolong life after a heart attack.  Fish and seafood consumption lowers blood triglycerides (fats); may improve heart function and reduce damage from heart disease; can lower blood pressure; and may improve symptoms of inflammatory diseases, arthritis and psoriasis.  The omega-3 fatty acids may also reduce the incidence of depression and postpartum depression in pregnant women.  Some fish and seafood may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s Disease and cognitive decline in the elderly.  In babies it contributes to vision development and nerve growth in the retina.   These benefits augur well for the drive to combat obesity and the related conditions of diabetes, hypertension, heart diseases and some forms of cancer (lifestyle diseases), which are reaching epidemic proportions in the region.   Adolescents and young children are also at risk since childhood obesity is also on the rise with overweight and obesity ranging from 25%-30%.  Changing the pattern of consumption from high cholesterol saturated fatty animal sources of protein to fish and seafood can contribute positively to a reduction in these lifestyle diseases.

For these shifts in consumption to occur, there needs to be:

·        Increased availability and accessibility to fish and seafood

·        Policies, systems and regulations to ensure sustainability and proper management of the resources (avoid overfishing)

·        Greater support by governments for the strengthening of the Fisheries sector

·        Public education with respect to the choice of fish and seafood to minimize the consumption of contaminated fish.  Consumers should avoid large fish species that are high up in the food chain since those are more prone to toxin accumulation

 

 

Executive Summary

Each CARICOM State derives varying levels of economic and socio-economic benefits from their respective coastal and marine fisheries resources, some of which are shared. Currently, most States allow open access to their fisheries. In addition, there is no agreement amongst the countries pertaining to the accessing of the region’s fisheries resources, in particular those that are shared. Continuation of such uncoordinated open access to these resources, despite regulated fishing in some states, can lead to overfishing and severe resource depletion. It will also result in reduced harvest levels triggering food and nutrition insecurity, lower export earnings. Fishing communities and rural areas in particular will experience quality of life losses. The CARICOM Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) will foster greater intra-regional cooperation and opportunities for increased benefits in individual states, and collectively across States, while promoting the long term resource sustainability.

 

 

 

Each CARICOM State derives varying levels of economic and socio-economic benefits from their respective coastal and marine fisheries resources, some of which are shared. Currently, most States allow open access to their fisheries. In addition, there is no agreement amongst the countries pertaining to the accessing of the region’s fisheries resources, in particular those that are shared. Continuation of such uncoordinated open access to these resources, despite regulated fishing in some states, can lead to overfishing and severe resource depletion. It will also result in reduced harvest levels triggering food and nutrition insecurity, lower export earnings. Fishing communities and rural areas in particular will experience quality of life losses. The CARICOM Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) will foster greater intra-regional cooperation and opportunities for increased benefits in individual states, and collectively across States, while promoting the long term resource sustainability.

 

 

Executive Summary

Each CARICOM State derives varying levels of economic and socio-economic benefits from their respective coastal and marine fisheries resources, some of which are shared. Currently, most States allow open access to their fisheries. In addition, there is no agreement amongst the countries pertaining to the accessing of the region’s fisheries resources, in particular those that are shared. Continuation of such uncoordinated open access to these resources, despite regulated fishing in some states, can lead to overfishing and severe resource depletion. It will also result in reduced harvest levels triggering food and nutrition insecurity, lower export earnings. Fishing communities and rural areas in particular will experience quality of life losses. The CARICOM Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) will foster greater intra-regional cooperation and opportunities for increased benefits in individual states, and collectively across States, while promoting the long term resource sustainability.

 

Member login

Username and Password